Sunday, December 16, 2007

p-force

What would the answer to this question be: IS RIDING PILLION MORE DIFFICULT THAN ACTUALLY RIDING A BIKE? If someone asked me this question and if I happened to have got used to only the Pulsar 220 and no other bike in India, my answer would surely be, "yes". For the past couple of days I allowed my brother to ride his bike ( allowed him to ride his bike!) while I experienced what it was like in the back seat. Honestly, now I've a bit of a sore bottom. The seat is grippy, the brakes, when applied, give you the vicarious sense of hitting a concrete wall head-on and the engine is a rocketship. Whenever he braked using even 50% of its might, I so violently moved forwards and hit him that I started to resist my movement to save his back. Alas, it took a toll on me; the constant rubbing action was becoming a bit too uncomfortable for my liking. When I sighed relief that all the braking was over, he would twist the throttle and I would be moving backwards towards the edge of the seat so quickly that it again hurt me (you know where!); except that in the opposite direction. Ouch!

This bike is too powerful for city commutes. The throttle is wafer-without-chocoloate crisp and that always sends the revs soaring high even when you don't need it; modulating the throttle at very low speeds is just shy of impossible. And, BTW, like g-force, I've named the forces I experienced on the Pulsar 220 as the p-force! And unlike the g-force which is measured in m/s/s, p-force will be meausured in the number of minutes it takes for the hurt to heel!



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http://rumblingv8.wordpress.com
http://wheelsofram.blogspot.com

5 comments:

sriram said...

Is this bike rear seat is harder than apache's?

SriramS said...

My feeling is that it's perceptibly softer than the Apache. Not too much, a little bit.

Chandrasekharan said...

hey give some operational details of Pulsar 220 - like mileage etc... in a seperate post

S R I R A M said...

Ya sure, Chandru.

Enid said...

Keep up the good work.